Covid-19 Update

Covid-19 Update: We're open for a range of services during the Level 4 lockdown. Use the Ask for an Appointment to get a phone appointment with us during this time. Please note that we will not be offering phone appointments over the Easter Weekend (10-13 April). 

We will be able to help with: emergency contraception prescriptions, contraceptive pill repeats (and some contraceptive pill starts) and abortion information.

If you are due for your depo provera jab or for your implant to be changed, we will give you a prescription for the pill until we're able to do face-to-face appointments again. 

If you have an appointment booked with us in the next month, we will be in touch with you to reschedule.

Due to infection control requirements we are unable to provide any face-to-face consultations in our clinics during the lockdown.

Schools, principals and teachers: Our Navigating the Journey sexuality education resources are available for just $25 (that's half-price) until the end of April. Our resource shop is closed for the duration of the lockdown but these e-resources are available for purchase. 

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Please contact us at resource@familyplanning.org.nz.


Research confirms importance of information and education

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Media Release

Family Planning says new research on the age at which New Zealand girls have their first period confirms how important information and education is for young people – before they enter puberty.

“Young people need to know what to expect, to understand what is happening to their bodies, how they can manage it, and who they can go to for support and information,” Family Planning National Health Promotion Advisor Amanda Hargreaves says.

The study, published in the New Zealand Medical Journal, looked at the age of first menstruation in New Zealand and the implications for age-appropriate education and support. The study also noted the number of girls getting their periods in primary and intermediate schools at just over 12,000 each year.

Puberty, including menstruation, is a component of sexuality education in The New Zealand Curriculum. Ministry of Education guidelines say it should be part of programmes from Year 5 onwards.

“While we need to teach about the menstrual cycle to all students, not just girls, our teaching programmes can and should do much more. We have a new suite of teaching resources to support teachers in this area. They include learning opportunities that support students in developing strategies to manage pubertal changes, carrying out inquiries into the range of menstrual products now available and the realities of period poverty, and investigations into the systems within their school that support girls in managing their period while at school. Students are encouraged to seek professional help if their periods are painful and not seen as a montly rite of passage. These investigations can also be used to inform senior management and Boards of Trustees about gaps or issues with their provision of services,” Ms Hargreaves says.

“In line with the Ministry of Education guidelines, our Navigating the Journey resources introduce the concept of menstruation in Year 5 – it’s important that all young people understand about menstruation and it’s relationship with conception – we’re well past the time when this is an issue only for the girls.” 

Family Planning has clinics located throughout New Zealand. Use the clinic finder to find your nearest clinic.

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