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World Contraception Day

Debunking the myths - today, condoms.

Monday, September 24, 2018

Feature

You’ve heard all the myths – You’ve been probably told about your neighbour’s daughter-in-law’s sister’s mother who had an IUD that travelled to their lungs and killed them, or that Uncle’s daughter’s third cousin who had a Jadelle implant that picked up a radio frequency and started controlling her mind. The reality is far more boring. Family Planning is here to dispel the myths are contraception. Here’s the first – condoms.

Condoms break easily

Condoms are actually quite strong – you just need to be careful if you have long finger nails or are wearing rings or sharp jewellery. If your condom does break – you can get the emergency contraceptive pill from a Family Planning clinic or from a chemist and this will protect you up to 72 hours after unprotected sex.

You need to wear two condoms together

No way! Using two condoms is not better than one! One is all you need and if you use more than one you’ll probably cause it to break. Use just one.

You have to be 18 to buy condoms

Not true! We want you to be safe whatever your age so please come into a clinic to get condoms if you need them. There is no age restriction in supermarkets or at chemists for condoms.

You don’t need a condom for oral sex

You should use a condom for oral sex because infections such as gonorrhoea, chlamydia and herpes can be passed on this way.

You don’t need a condom for anal sex because you can’t get pregnant

You might not be able to get pregnant through anal sex but you’re still at risk of STIs. Always use a condom if you don’t know the sexual history of your partner.

My penis is too big for a condom

A condom can stretch to 18 inches round. Your penis isn’t that big.

My condom wouldn’t work

If the condom won't roll down, it's the wrong way round. Throw it away and use a new one.

All brands of condom are the same

Yes and no. You do need to check the use-by date of condoms. Novelty condoms aren't always safe and nor are ones bought online. Always buy condoms from a reputable source. Also the condom you carried around in your back pocket for six years is probably bad now.

Condoms are a great contraception but they also provide protection against STIs. They’re an excellent choice for all genders.

Your decision to get an IUD should be based on facts– your local Family Planning nurse is happy to talk to you about your options. Just get in touch.

 

 

Family Planning has clinics located throughout New Zealand. Use the clinic finder to find your nearest clinic.

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